News


Calling it a “great first step”, New Jersey State Policemen's Benevolent Association President Patrick Colligan today released the following statement thanking the Appellate Division for granting the request by the State PBA and a number of other law enforcement unions for a stay of the Attorney General's Directives requiring law enforcement agencies to release the names of law enforcement officers who were issued major discipline since 2000. 
 
A number of law enforcement agencies intended to release and publish this information by July 15th.  This means that law enforcement agencies cannot publish the names of law enforcement officers who have been issued major discipline and summaries of that discipline pending further order of the Court. 
 
Colligan and the NJSPBA were among a number of concerned members of the law enforcement community who immediately rushed to the defense of members of law enforcement to ensure that confidential and personal files could not be simply released by fiat with no examination of the legality and potentially devastating consequences that will surely accompany the Attorney General’s decree.
 
“We have consistently said that we are willing to work with the Attorney General towards a resolution that is fair, just as we always have,” said Colligan.  “In the absence of partnership that allows us all to root out bad actors without sacrificing individuals who will be unfairly ruined in the rush to secure a soundbite, we will continue to pursue any and all legal remedies.  We know that this is an ongoing process, but this ruling is a great first step for our members and for the public at large.”
 
The case will be argued before the Appellate Division in October and the Appellate Division will issue a decision on whether to permanently stay the Attorney General's Directives. 

Governor Murphy has signed legislation moved by the NJ State PBA to exempt law enforcement officers from the magazine capacity limit. The law ensures that active duty officers can carry magazines on and off duty up to 17 rounds and exempts officers authorized to carry rifles capable of holding more than 17 rounds as well. 

The existing law already protected the rights of retired officers to carry 15 round magazines and that exemption remains intact.

We are also addressing the retiree carry rules in their entirety for the next legislative session. It is our hope to clarify and simplify the current legislation to address NJ law and statutes and its relationship with the Federal LEOSA rules.

The General Assembly has unanimously passed legislation today to address the ability of off duty law enforcement officers to carry firearm magazines of greater than 10 rounds. The bill addresses errors in the law identified by the State PBA. This legislation, written at our request, overrules the letters sent out recently by county prosecutors prohibiting officers from carrying large capacity magazines off duty. The governor is expected to sign the legislation as soon as practical, possibly as soon as tomorrow.

ATTENTION MEMBERS! The Magazine Capacity Bill (S2846/A4304) has already passed the Senate. The Speaker has agreed to post the Bill at our request as an emergency on Monday, December 17th for a floor vote. We understand some of your agencies have limited your ability to carry these magazines despite the fact that we are always technically on duty. We will keep you posted, check back for updates Monday.

Legislation has been introduced this session that will lower the legal capacity for ammunition magazines.  But before rumors about the bill spread we want to make clear to the law enforcement community that active, off duty and retired officers are exempt from the reduced capacity required by the bill.  Section 2 and Section 3 of Senate Bill 102/Assembly Bill 2761 clearly maintains the status quo for all active and retired officers.   Although the bill has no impact on the law enforcement community, we monitor all gun bills closely and we will be meeting with Senate members on Friday.