Member Interest

  • Downloads and Forms

    Access downloadable documents as well as public and private NJSPBA forms. Continue…

  • Legislative News

    Keeping members informed of what is going on in the political world around them. Continue…

  • Legal Protection (LPP)

    A self funded member benefit that provides legal protection to active members of the NJSPBA in good standing. Continue…

  • Pension Planning

    A resource center to keep our members up to date on pension events, webinars, links, dates and information. Continue…


NJ State PBA Promotional Video

News

UPDATED INFORMATION ON 20 & OUT RETIREMENT

This letter from the Chair of the PFRSNJ Board of Trustees is being sent this morning to the Certifying Officers of all PFRS locations. This letter will answer many of the questions that have been asked.

View Additional Information Here

STATEMENT OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF POLICE ORGANIZATIONS ON THE VERDICTS IN THE CRIMINAL TRIAL OF POLICE OFFICER DEREK CHAUVIN

Despite all the claims to the contrary, the criminal justice system in the United States works, even when the person accused of a crime is a police officer.  The trial and unanimous conviction on all counts of former police officer Derek Chauvin in Minnesota conclusively demonstrates that officers can be, and in fact are, held to the same standards of justice as all other citizens in our nation, as they should be.  The facts of the case surrounding the murder of George Floyd present a horrific tragedy on so many different levels.  At the most basic, a man lost his life needlessly at the hands of an officer.  At the same time, the assertions by so many who wish to demonize all police officers because of the actions of one officer have been shown to be hollow.

Due process rights do not prevent the investigation, charging, trial, and conviction of a police officer.  Neither does qualified immunity.  Neither do police unions, associations, or legal defense plans.

Police departments, unions, associations, prosecutors, and defense attorneys all have their proper role to play, and all citizens, including officers who are accused of a crime, are entitled to their day in court and to have an impartial judge and jury weigh the evidence against them.  They are entitled to have their side of the issue heard and considered.  And all of us must respect the decisions of the court system when these fundamental rules of due process are applied.

We, the men and women of this Association, serve the American criminal justice system, sometimes at the cost of our very lives.  We respect the verdict of the justice system in this case, and we continue to stand for the proposition that respecting the fundamental Constitutional rights of all persons accused of committing an offense, even when that person is a police officer, is no obstacle to the attaining of justice.  In fact, it is the very foundation upon which justice can be obtained.

The National Association of Police Organizations, founded in 1978, represents more than 241,000 sworn, rank-and-file law enforcement officers across the United States.

Governor will sign 20 & Out Law Today

Governor Murphy’s office has advised us that he will today sign legislation proposed by the State PBA to reinstate the 20 and Out retirement benefit for PFRS members. The State PBA has been actively pushing the Legislature to restore 20 and Out after it was gutted by the Christie Administration. The State PBA, who drafted the bill and selected the sponsors, appreciate the support of the Governor to return fairness to our members retirement options.

We are also grateful to the bills prime sponsors - Senator Gopal, Senator Lagana, Assemblyman DeAngelo, Assemblyman Dancer and Assemblywoman Chaparro - as well as Senate President Sweeney and Speaker Coughlin who prioritized moving the bill at our request.

The legislation will reestablish 20 and Out as a retirement option for PFRS members for the next 2 years. Members who qualify during that time period will receive a pension of 50% of their final salary but with no health benefits. The 2 year window will allow the State PBA, PFRS Board and legislative leaders to study the impact of the retirement benefit on the funded level of the pension system.

At a time when law enforcement has become more hazardous, more stressful and more unappreciated as ever before, this retirement option will give a level of peace of mind to our members who have been “burned out” by the job. The State PBA will continue to prioritize protecting and strengthening the pension and benefit rights available to the law enforcement community in New Jersey and today’s bill signing is just another example of that.

20 and Out Passes Assembly; Sent to Governor

The State PBA initiated bill to reestablish the 20 and Out benefit was passed in the General Assembly today.  The bill now heads to the Governor for his consideration.  We have been in contact with Governor Murphy’s office to express the need for his support for the legislation.

The bill will restore the 20 and Out PFRS benefit for 2 years after its enactment in order to assess the financial impact of the benefit on the pension system.  While we believe that this retirement option will remain infrequently, as it has been for the last 20 years, we also must ensure that anything we pursue does not negatively impact the health of the PFRS.  The long term health and growth of PFRS is of obvious critical importance.  But restoring 20 and Out now ensures fairness to provide PFRS members benefits they were promised when they become officers two decades ago.  We firmly believe that the next 2 years will prove our fiscal analysis correct that 20 and Out will have little impact on PFRS, thereby disproving the inaccurate cost estimate proposed by the League of Municipalities and Association of Counties, thus opening the door to make 20 and Out permanent.

It is important to remind PBA members that existing State Law prohibits providing employer paid health benefits to a retiree unless a member has 25 years of service.  Therefore there are no health benefits provided to officers who retire at 20 years.  But the member would receive 50% of their final salary regardless of age as a pension for the rest of their life. 

Passage of the bill was a major priority for the State PBA and we would like to thank Senate President Sweeney and Speaker Coughlin for moving the bill and our sponsors, Senator Gopal, Assemblyman DeAngelo and Assemblyman Dancer for their steadfast support.

State PBA Proposed “20 and Out” bill on fast track

The Assembly Appropriations Committee today released Senate Bill 1017 to restore the 20 and Out retirement benefit to PFRS. The bill has already been scheduled for final passage in the Assembly on March 1st, 2021 where, following passage, it will be sent to the Governor for his signature.

Today’s action is the final Committee step in a years long process by the State PBA to restore justice to PFRS members who had this benefit taken from them by the Christie Administration.

1 2 3 4 5  ... 

NJ Cops Magazine

March 2021 Back Issues
Speaking Cops Podcast Shop NJSPBA Election Volunteers Member Login

President's Message

Patrick Colligan, NJSPBA President Patrick Colligan, President

If they can do it to us…

This year has certainly been one for the ages. A global pandemic, hurricanes, wildfires, the most divisive presidential election in our history, the murder of George Floyd, an asteroid that might hit be-fore election day and – because we haven’t had quite enough yet – murder hornets. I can hardly wait for November and December!

Needless to say, a few of these issues have had a profound effect on us in New Jersey. Twelve New Jersey officers lost their lives to COVID-19. Nine of them were PBA members. Some 120 officers throughout the country succumbed to the horrible disease, and tens of thousands of our brother and sister officers were profoundly affected. Many will never return to work.

As bad as we thought COVID was, May 25 was a day that changed policing forever. Some changes certainly will be for the better. Some will be downright dangerous, not only for the women and men who choose to do this job, but also for the citizens we’ve sworn to protect and serve.

So let’s fast forward to the federal Justice in Policing Act. In the rush to “do some-thing,” Congress drafted a really bad bill. The group that enjoys absolute immunity wants to take away our qualified immunity. I hope the “qualified” sufficiently describes our immunity. Yes, you are correct. We have to qualify for the immunity from lawsuits filed for damages resulting our mistakes. If you chose to act in a way that shocks the conscience or is so outside the norms of normal police work, you’re on your own. (And frankly, you should be). We make mistakes, no doubt about it. We aren’t Walmart greeters. We are in a dangerous and often ugly business. But many forget about that.

Some members of our New Jersey congressional delegation chose to sign onto that bill. One of them was even a co-sponsor. We’ve enjoyed some very close relationships and friendships with our delegation over the years. I hope I don’t have to tell you we were on the phone immediately after that bill came up. Marc, Rob and I were on some very long calls telling representatives exactly what that would do to our members and the very future of recruiting qualified candidates. A severe recruiting problem already exists.

There was no ambiguity in our conversations whatsoever. Removing qualified immunity was an absolute line in the sand. Of course, they were free to support the bill, but not without consequences.

I guess more than one of these elected officials thought we were bluffing. As they know by now, we weren’t. We have either walked away from our support or backed another congressional candidate. Yes, not without repercussions, but I live by a pretty simple rule in my life: Win, lose or draw, the day I can’t look myself in the mirror, I’ll walk away from this position.

Their unanimous answer of “it’s not passing anyway” was a shallow, feeble excuse. Depending on this election, that bill will probably be back and the “it’s not passing anyway” excuse won’t be such a shallow answer anymore.

So the delegation says, “If they do it to us, they can do it to anybody.” Not so quick folks. Maybe you weren’t listening to us on those calls. It was a line in the sand and unlike some of you, I mean what I say. The difference is, I can still proudly look at myself in a mirror today.

Events